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Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the attention is on china. the north's most influential ally. today on china report, we look at the response from leaders in bejing and what motivates their longstanding relationship with an isolated regime. >> reporter: chinese media were quick to respond to the rocket launch. tv networks ran a news clip using reports by foreign news agencies. but it took a full six hours for the chinese government to issue a formal comment. it was made during the regular press conference of the foreign ministry. >> translator: it's regrettable that north korea went ahead with the launch, despite the international's community close attention. as a member of the united nations, the north has the obligation to respect security council resolutions. >> reporter: china is north korea's neighbor and the most important of its fuel lines, also an economic superpower, since fighting the korean war together, the two countries have maintained close relations. in september, north korea held a briefing in beijing, calling for massive investment in a special economic zone. shape, and the only way it will improve is thro
is on china. the north's most influential ally. today on china report, we look at the response from leaders in bejing and what motivates their longstanding relationship with an isolated regime. >> reporter: chinese media were quick to respond to the rocket launch. tv networks ran a news clip using reports by foreign news agencies. but it took a full six hours for the chinese government to issue a formal comment.ititititititit press conference of the foreign ministry. >> translator: it's regrettable that north korea went ahead with the launch, despite the international's community close attention. as a member of the united nations, the north has the obligation to respect security council resolutions. >> reporter: china is north korea's neighbor and the most important of its fuel lines, also an economic superpower, since fighting the korean war together, the two countries have maintained close relations. in september, north korea held a briefing in beijing, calling for massive investment in a special economic zone. the north's economy is in dire shape, and the only way it will improve is thr
we're really engaging diplomatically with china and other members of united nations security council on tougher resolutions and possibly sanctions. >> making any progress? >> you have to talk to the ambassadors in new york and the sea to figure out what is going on. -- d.c. to figure out what is going on. >> in beijing, what is the view among the leaders you can tell of kim jong-u7n? -- kim jong-un? >> china would like all the parties that are part of this sixth party talks her to get back to the table, to see if we can encourage better behavior from north korea as opposed to imposing sanctions now and trying to coerce north korea into the fold. that is a difference of opinion of strategy. china really believes we ought to be engaged with north korea. united states feels every time we've tried to engage with north korea, they basically turnaround and failed to respond. >> what is the most important thing the chinese leaders want from you every day? >> the want greater cooperation with united states, because the understand how important united states is for their own economy.
of course. so trying to -- china is a much interest in canadian energy and natural resources. we are very much interested in building trust, strategic trust and cooperation with china. and from enable perspective, of course, i'll give you one sort of anecdote. you were referring to this the islands, two months ago i attended the western pacific naval symposium hosted -- and have the opportunity to sit between the deputy commander of the people's liberation army navy, and the commander of the ambassadors japanese maritime self-defense force, a euphemism for the japanese navy. it was at a time when the island was leading on cnn and bbc. i thought as i was sitting between two them there's an opportunity for a canadian to do something extraordinary from an naval diplomatic perspective and put this thing to bed. [laughter] >> how did that go? >> not too well, not too well. [laughter] which is my point. i spoke with the chinese admirals interpreter. i spoke with admiral commander in english, a great conversation. but never was the bridge build or even considered. and i think one of the key issu
and this brings back sweet memories of when china was very isolated during the cold war. in the end, there's a whole new generation of people who have been much more sophisticated understanding, but that i would say it's a very strong autonomic response to the united states beefing up its forces in australia and then they wake up one morning and burma has flipped on them. it was eternal in terms of their faithful allies. these things caused a lot of consternation. so the old fear of diagnostically speaking in china is to fear with sand and travel without. these things happening around them excite them. >> how much does it add to that anxiety is that all? >> is the most problematic relationship now in japan and this is not good. i have to say i think japan probably hasn't played this as well as it might have, but i think on the other hand it would be fair to say also that it serves china's purposes to have something happening outside his orders which can rally people at home. there's a lot of complex things going on in each of these reactions to foreign movements outside. >> which ma
will look at the new communist party of leadership in china and that impact on u.s.- china relations. hosted by the center for strategic and international studies in washington, this is an hour. i'd also like to recognize former ambassador to china jim sasser who's sitting right there, one of my close friends. thank you for coming, senator. glad to see you. well, the panel is a really good one, kurt campbell, assistant secretary of state for east asia and pacific affairs. he became -- came to that job in 2009, previously the ceo and co- founder of the center for a new american security. he was a professor at harvard, associate professor of public policy and international relations at the kennedy school. chris johnson, senior adviser and freeman chair in china studies here at csis. his most important public service, as far as i'm concerned, is he gave me a lot of help in preparing for the presidential debate. and i'll be -- always be grateful for that, chris. he's frequently advised senior white house, cabinet, congressional, military and foreign officials on chinese leadership and on beijing
and partners such as singapore and the philippines and expanding our dialogue in exchanges with china. we are also an handed our presence and capabilities in the region. that includes -- expanding our presence and capabilities in the region. that includes allocating our naval fleet to have a 60/40 split between the pacific and atlantic oceans, increasing army and marine presence in the region. locating our most advanced aircraft in the pacific, including new deployments of f- 22's and the mv22's to japan. and lay the groundwork for the first overseas deployment of the f-35 joint strike fighter. the third element of our strategy is that as we do force projection in the asia-pacific and middle east, we still have to maintain our global leadership and presence by building innovative partnerships and partner capacity across the globe and using these innovative rotational deployment as a way to do exercises and training with other countries, developing their capabilities so they can provide for their own security. in latin america, africa, europe, and elsewhere. the past decade of war has rein
hard currency on the open market. >> and though the soviet empire is a thing of the past, china is echoing the aspirations of its predecessor. >> there's no question that we're going to face a very serious challenge in the years to come, dealing with a rising china that wants to be dominant and hegemonic in its own region, wants to control sea lines of communication, wants to control the south china sea. and we have allies who stand to lose from that and look to us for support. i think that's the likeliest area of actual conflict. >> the pentagon will often say and right now the u.s. spends something like 4, 5, 6 times what china spends on its defense spending. and the big question then becomes what is china's intention? (instrumental music) >> in a national call to arms defense secretary leon panetta warned the threat of a significant cyber attack against america is already here. >> the collective result of these kinds of attacks could be a cyber pearl harbor. >> what are the threats american's face in this century? with the attacks of september 11th, the u.s. has had to comple
history tv on c-span3. >> china's emerging global power and maritime strategy were the focus of a panel discussion at the halifax international security forum. panelists discuss the territorial disputes involving japan in the east china sea, cybersecurity and international diplomacy. this is an hour, ten minutes. >> welcome back, everybody. this session for miscalculation, china and the rise of confusion or confucianism. i'd like to hand over to steve clemens who's moderating this session. .. >> thank you all for joining us. when i was thinking about the title today and thinking about our panel, it occurred to me, and i went online to find a chinese event that is being held right now looking at u.s. grand strategy, canada, japan and india. there are no canadian, japanese americans or canadians on china's panel. don't have any chinese with us today but we should have a lot of fun discussing that our national strategies but involving in the asian pacific region and with china but i want to acknowledge that that voice wasn't with us today. that might give us more room to run. because we do
india and china to develop into a completely distinct world civilizations without having much to do with each other for long-term history. let's take that image that you offered of america, this amazingly simple geographic place with all of these natural harbors and rivers that run the right way but that was true for thousands of years and didn't leave to the development to rate civilization and european civilization and began to make powerful use of those the geographical advantages are obvious, so help us think about why it's geography that we should focus on as opposed to the cultural or civilization will aspect. >> that was due to the development of the failing chips which enable the croswell landed voyages, so that development of technology while it is short in distance it did not negate, it made it more important because it opened up a whole new geography and the world trade system cultural and economics flow from the geography because what is culture? it is the accumulated experience of a specific people on may specifically and skate over hundreds of thousands of years that l
counterterrorism, and then the u.s. ambassador to china, gary locke, on the relationship between the two countries. >> our first experience was to come in a different way than every other family up here. probably never happen again in history. and it's interesting because after dad was sworn in, we went and took a picture, photo of the family, behind the oval office desk, and that night we didn't get to move into the white house because nixon had left so quickly, so unexpectedly, they left their daughter and son-in-law, david eisenhower, to pack all their clothes and belongings. it literally took seven or eight days. we had to go back to our little house in alexandria, virginia, suburbia, the neighborhood was surrounded by secret service. we had been living there dad was vice president. and i'll never forget. that night mom is cooking dinner. literally, we're sitting around the dinner table, and mom is cooking dinner, and she looked over at my dad and goes, gerry, something is wrong here. you just became president of the united states and i'm still cooking. >> steve ford, linda johnson robb, and j
, with russia and china, containment when it came to russia was countering their expansive capabilities. >> rose: right. >> our own -- when it came to their nuclear capability we were talking about deterrence. >> rose: right. >> and so i think first we want to contain iranian influence in the region, but i think the question that people are -- that what the president is really addressing is, or would we be content with deterrence? >> right. >> and there i think the difference in the ayatollahs and their religious, their they cratic approach to the world, their threats to destroy israel make them a more worrisome, significantly more worrisome possess sorry of nuclear weapons than other nuclear states. >> rose: because they have a different decision al type structure. >> yes. >> rose: from russia, and the soviet union from going into europe once again, deterrence is mutually assured destruction. and so then, does the question of value and life, different because of a culture that can produce suicide bombers mean that there -- means that will not work in the end or do you say no nationable and the
'm with the world journal. could you address growing chinese assertiveness in south china sea and east china sea? and given china just announced they will intercept the ship's that go into territorial waters. so are you going to participate in upcoming defense talks with chinese? and what message do you want to tell them? thank you. >> well, thank you for that question. of course the issues that are being placed today in a south china sea and other areas in the north and central, east asia, i think are quite complicated because of the nature of the territorial disputes, some of them historic, some of them now driven by the need for access to resources in those areas, and that's i think to some degree has motivated some of the activities that you see, seeing there. the u.s. position as you know is that we don't take sides on territorial disputes. there's many of those around the globe, not just in the south china sea. but we do want them resolve peacefully, without coercion. and that we call on all the parties there, including the chinese, to ensure that as they approach these problems that they
'm with the "world journal" could you address the growing chinese assertivenesses the south china sea and the east china sea -- the foreign ships are going territorial waters. so are you going participate in the coming events? and what can that message -- [inaudible] thank you. >> well, thank you for that question. of course, the issues that are being faced today in the south china sea and other areas in the north and central east asia, i think are complicated because of the nature of the territorial disputes. some of them historic, some of them now driven by the need for access to resources in those areas, and i think, to some degree has motivated some of the activities you see seeing there. the u.s. position, as you know, we don't take sides on territorial dispute. there's many of those around the globe not just around the south china sea. we want them resolved peacefully, without coerce. and that we call on all the parties there including the chinese to ensure that as the approach the problems they do so in a way that avoids con flict within that avoids miscalculation, that using the vehicles a
.n. security resolutions. he also talked about china's decision to the aircraft carrier in the obama administration shifted À la terry resources for the pacific region. this is a half-hour. >> well, good morning and allow hot. i am glad to be here to talk to you about the pacific command, where we are today to where we see ourselves heading in the future. since the last time i was here, we continue to move forward on the rebalanced initiative after as directed by president obama. the rebalanced rows on the strengths of the entire u.s. government, including policy, diplomacy, trade and of course security and that the area i work in. for me, the rebalanced has been and continues to be the strength of the relationships, adjusting our military posture and presents and employ new capacities to ensure we continue to effectively and efficiently contribute to the stability of the asia-pacific as we protect u.s. national interests. of course the keys to success of the innovative access agreement, greatly increased exercises, rotational presence increases come efficient force posture in yeste
to pyongyang. press articles hail the fact that china in anticipation of the recent launch had begun inspecting cargo on north korean ships in search of contraband. the question this raises is why has chi gnat not been inspecting north korean ships since 2006 as called for in a u.n. resolution, reinforced by another resolution in 2009. if u.n. member states would only enforce the sanctions currently on the books, north korea would be unable to ignore the swer national community and the civilized world. the time for coordinated international action is now. the time, in fact, is long overdue. with that, mr. speakering i reserve the balance of our time. the speaker pro tempore: the squom from florida reserves. the gentleman from california, mr. berman is recognized. mr. berman: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise in strong support of h.con.res. 145 as amended and yield myself such time as i may consume. sproy the gentleman is recognized. mr. berman: i would like to thank the sponsor of this legislation, ms. ros-lehtinen, for her leadership on this issue and her work in addressing the north korean threa
and secondly which could be more important the recovery in china for industrial production steel consumption and that would help. ashley: nat gas was so cheap it was ridiculous and actually killed coal but those prices have come up a little bit now. >> if we get a normal winter that will increase the amount of natural gas consumed, increase the amount of electricity. the winter got off probably slower start than i think most bulls would have liked to have seen, it is picking up as well and i think that will be helpful. ashley: you're mainly bullish because the demand for u.s. coal abroad. you mentioned china, that's probably our biggest customer, i would imagine. there are different types of coal. i don't want to get too technical. >> there's two types of coal -- coal, coal used to make electricity and the coal we sell to european asian latin american utilities, that we expect to increase the demand from the rest of the world. secondly the steel making coal which is used in europe brazil and in asia and we are one of the top three exporters of that coal in the world, and as the recovery in s
in china where they claim to encounter racism unparalleled in any part of the world they had gone to. irritatingly stayed in branches of the ymca, the equivalent for grown men of the boy scouts and they were cheered on by enclaves of indians and especially -- the constant stated the dias pro-for the most of the globe remarkably a consequence of empire and counterweights to it. a different diaspora and yet similar manifestation of the internationalism supported -- in this clutch of circumnavigate errors, this international on his slightly later surface to her of the world. he came from a privileged russian family but that was of no help when he found himself on the losing side in the russian civil war during that country's revolution. as a white russian stranded in china the man without a country so destitute that he made his way to shanghai overland and a mix of men's and women's clothing. in shanghai he obtained passports, documents of the league of nations have begun to issue to stateless refugees initially russians in 1922. a first step in the development of international refugee
would be short yen and long japanese stocks. >> people watching not just january but china. ir ir ir iron oar a lot. >> let's get more insight from steve from web bush securities. how much of a nail biter is this for you in terms of fiscal cliff and the markets? >> i think pretty clear at this point that if there's a deal coming, it's gonna be coming very, very soon. i think the markets discounted the fact we are going to get some sort of deal t has held up fairly well here and i think if we don't get a deal, we will see a selloff. i don't know how considerable, but certainly see the 2, 3% decline in the market. >> does it amaze you, steve, that the markets, in your view, still consider a given that we are going to reach a deal? here we are thursday, december 27th. they still haven't issued a 48-hur notice for congress to return to capitol hill and yet you're saying the markets have baked in some sort of deal? >> yeah, i think so. i don't in he isly think the deal happened december 31st. if we pass waite without a deal earthquake the market will think something is going to happen in
more cooperatively to counter china. so certainly senator kerry, if he becomes the next secretary of state have a full plate. >> what was he like in terms of his personality? i covered him in 2004 when he was running for president in george w. bush and he was not really able to relate or identify to everyday folks, but he has quite a reputation overseas and abroad. overseas and abroad he has a reputation for knowing issue and he has relationships with a lot of world leaders and it was senator john kerry who convinced afghan president hamid karzai to go for a runoff election when the presidential elections were in question and i think he's going to be able to relate to leaders suft as secretary clinton did as a politician when these leaders are having problems compromising to say, listen, i'm in your seat. i know where you've been and run for office before and i think that will serve him well. here in washington, he is seen as someone who is very confident and on top of his brief and also someone who likes to control issues, and such as the middle east. he's someone who drills down
is the economic power house already now and in the future. you have china militarizing in that region, north korea and so much commerce, money, and trade that everyone depends on now in asia. to have the militarization of the region by two such uncertain countries with uncertain tensions it is a chilling affect on the world economy. first the u.s., the national security concern about what north korea mooib might do. the deeper, broader, long-term concern about economics and trade in the region, but for them to achieve this kind of success with a long-range missile launch, that means combined with their nuclear program, by the way, of course means the concern now full tilt that they have the capability for an intercontinental ballistic missile launch, potentially in the future with a nuclear warhead and that could put hawaii, alaska and the west coast of the united states one day at risk. >> victor cha, when the government says at no time was the missile or the debris a threat to america. is it a matter of time before kim jong-un is a threat to america. >> it is only a matter of time and the time i
is long but it starts in asia with the rise of china and india as economic, political and military powers. the obama administration has conspicuously announced a pivot to asia. at the center of this pivot is china, which exists as both an adversary to certain u.s. interests and a fellow traveler sharing mutual goals and vulnerabilities on others. the ongoing challenge will be for the united states to disce discern, sometimes issue by issue, whether china is an adversary or a partner. and this calibration will impact america's relations with the rest of asia and may ultimately determine prospects for war or peace in this world. while visiting indonesia, thailand and the philippines in october, i was reminded of the economic vitality of southeast asia and the fact that the ten countries comprising asean represent now the fourth largest export market of the united states. these countries are center stage to the circumstances with china. we must stand firm with our friends throughout asia and actively pursuit prospects for free trade and open sea lanes and other policies that will strengthen
standard of living. a list of such changes is long, but its start in asia with the rise of china and india -- but it starts in asia with the rise of china and india. at the center of this pivot is china, which exits as an adversary and a fellow traveler, ensuring mutual goals -- in sharing mutual goals -- as a fellow traveler, sharing mutual goals. this will impact american relations with the rest of asia and may even help determine prospects for peace or war. in visiting thailand and the philippines in october, i was reminded of the economic vitality of southeast asia and the fact that that tend countries comprise an asean represent now the fourth largest export market of the united states. these countries are center stage. we must stand firm with our friends throughout asia and actively pursue prospects for free trade and open sea lanes and other policies that will strengthen american economic growth. more broadly, we face the specter of global resource constraints, especially efficiencies of energy and food that could stimulate conflict and deepen poverty. we have made startling gains i
in china, a man without a country. so destitute that he made his way to shanghai in a mix of men and women's castoff clothing. in shanghai he obtained a passport, a document that the league of nations have begun to issue to stateless refugees, initially russian, in 1922, a first dip in the development of international refugee law and policy, the international office of refugees would when that 1938 peace prize. a year and to rally members of the non bolshevik russian diaspore and wasted they could do something akin to lembergs inspiring recent flight across the atlantic. in 1928 he decided it was up to him to do a proudly tatterdemalion, go round the world alone by bicycle. luckily did not have to do that and departed shanghai on a battered second-hand bicycle been upgraded to a new bicycle in bangkok in in a battered second-hand motorcycle in singapore. a benefactor gave him a brand new aerial motorcycle was a letter that guaranteed assistance. he think the worldwide services of the ymca, shell oil, and the firestone company and depended on the global availability of gasoline, oil, and fo
invited a number of us to go with them to china. it was quite an experience. senator stevens -- of course, another world war ii veteran -- had flown the first cargo play plane into what was then peking in 1974. and senator inouye was well-regarded in china for that service. and so the group of norse -- there must have been -- and so the group of norse -- ther of se must have been a dozen of us -- got together with the leaders of china. we were accorded every courtesy we could possibly be accorded because of the presence of senator inouye and senator stevens. they were like brothers. they called one another "brothers." they acted that way in private. they served that way in the senate as chairman and vice-chairman and vice-chairman and chairman of the appropriations committee. they single-handedly shaped our american defense posture and they did it with skill and pay troivmen--and patriotism and the that very few could have. several senators have mentioned how bipartisan dan inouye was. he was of the old school. not a bad school for today, in my point of view. he treated each senator with
kazahkstan, turkmenistan and countries all the way east to china and western europe or europe comprise an east/west axis, the corridor through which oil, gas but also industrial goods, ideas and information can flow. um, the russian situation is not dissimilar. the russian situation in europe with gas is similar to iranian or saudi situation with oil. it's all about market share. >> right. >> so if you have azerbaijanny gas, turkmen gas competing with european gas or russian gas, for that matter lng from algeria, it may drive the market share down, it may drive the prices down, and europe is really at a, at a crossroads because they need to decide whether to go with natural gas or continue with coal and continue with nuclear. so gas plays a strategic energy role in europe right now. and you asked about what can we do. >> that's the most important crux of all of -- >> trillion dollar question. we did not coordinate enough with western europe, and western europe by itself especially now with the economic crisis is not really focused enough on insuring that east/west plans will go through
would not say -- i was not referring to just the soviet union and nazi germany. communist china killed far more of those two tyrannies combined, with no christian heritage to speak of. there are serious scholars that makes serious arguments that there is something and luther's temperament that was germanic. he was no democrat. the more, the merrier. religious factions or alternative sources of social authority. what you want is a society in which the state does not monopolized social authority. >> you talked extensively about religion in the united states contributing to [inaudible] there is one particular force that think they can inflict their views on this country. they insist said it was the intention of the founding fathers to create a christian equivalent of iran, which i do not think is the case. just because you are religious, it does not make you write all the time. >> get in line with everybody else. with respect, i disagree with what you just said. the religious right, which i obviously am not a member, rose after the religious left in the form of the reverend martin luther
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)